Home > All Is Well (TM), Blogs, Fisks > St. Pat’s Dublin – The Fiats of GenCon09

St. Pat’s Dublin – The Fiats of GenCon09

22 December 2009

In the beginning the universe (i.e., the Episcopal Church) didn’t have women on vestries.  And the progressives spoke, and women became ordained.  Later, there were wranglings over the prayer book.  Then over homo-sex.  And in 2009, the progressives spoke again, and gays were officially affirmed in the universe (i.e., the Episcopal Church). 

Confused?  That’s how I felt when I read this wrap-up on GC09, written by those fiat-speakers over at St. Pat’s Dublin:

“After more than 40 years we may be finished with legislating about sexuality.  It all began over 40 years ago when we began to seriously debate women’s eligibility for serving on vestries, as delegates to Diocesan Convention and Deputies to the National Convention.  Then we moved on to talk of women�s ordination, and finally the full inclusion of gays and lesbians.  Other than a couple of conventions where we hotly debated the revision of the prayer book, it seems as if we have talked on nothing else but issues of gender and sexuality. 

We are done.  Sure the issue will continue to come up, but it will no longer occupy center stage…”

Hallelujah! 

But wait -there’s more…

“Instead, we are talking about and will talk more and more about mission.  It has already begun with this convention.  We were told that our partnerships throughout the Anglican Communion are one of the best, have been one of the best, and will continue as one of the best Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) for creating viable, sustainable economic development in some of the poorest communities of the world.   The leaders of Episcopal Relief and Development shared with us how they surpassed their goal of raising $3 million over the last three years for eliminating extreme poverty.  They raised $3.5 million.”

Great.  We’re no longer concerned about asking people to give up sin as they turn to Christ, but instead to eliminating poverty.  Say, you don’t suppose that duplicates the work of (oh, I dunno) lots and lots of charitable organizations, do you? 

I love this last line:

“The future of the Episcopal Church looks bright as we increasingly devote ourselves to mission throughout the world, to caring for the earth, and to proclaiming the Gospel to a hurting world.”

Yessir, the future of the Episcopal Church does indeed look bright.  Not because of facts, mind you… but because we can always throw another General Convention in three years time, and declare (by fiat, of course) that things are fine and the future is bright. 

You didn’t think that General Conventions were bound by human frailty, did you?  Silly reader.

– Elder

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  1. Pearls Before Swine
    22 December 2009 at 3:15 AM

    I’m assuming by “done” they mean that TEC will sign onto the Covenant, abide by all the moritoria, wait patiently, and only move forward with SSBs and SSMs once the rest of the Anglican Communion forces them to.

    I will have to admit though that a relief organization who has a goal of only 99.3% overhead so that a whopping 0.7% can go to the MDGs probably should get out of the way and allow the other organizations that have say only a 30% overhead or less to do that work.

  2. Elder Oyster
    23 December 2009 at 8:43 PM

    RE: “I’m assuming by “done” they mean that TEC will sign onto the Covenant, abide by all the moritoria, wait patiently, and only move forward with SSBs and SSMs once the rest of the Anglican Communion forces them to.”

    One of the moderators over at StandFirm pointed out that things are different now in TEC than they were when the Windsor Process begain – back then, there was a lot of duplicity; now, the evil is out in the open. I tend to agree with that assessment, and that it will in turn make it more difficult for the higher-ups to waffle on coming in with real discipline.

    On the other hand, I’m not holding out hope that such a process would be of benefit of me in the next ten or so years.

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